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 Post subject: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:52 am 
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Should we have issues with Halloween ??


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:32 am 
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Oh, and here I thought you were going to ask me where the Halloween theme was ; )


(don't worry, to all of you who had trouble seeing the orange print on a black background, or whatever it was... this site doesn't have the same option, lol)


The only problem I ever had with halloween is that we spend 364 days a year teaching our children not to take candy from strangers... and then in one day, that is all we tell them TO do, lol.

But... I do like to raid their candy hordes ; )


I don't know the origin of halloween actually. I think Shelby wrote about it last year, but I forget.


Peace,
tammy


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:36 am 
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween

Halloween or Hallowe'en (/ˌhæləˈwin, -oʊˈin, ˌhɒl-/; a contraction of "All Hallows' Evening"),[5] also known as All Hallows' Eve,[6] is a yearly celebration observed in a number of countries on October 31, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows' Day. It initiates the triduum of Hallowmas, the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed believers.[7]
According to many scholars, All Hallows' Eve is a Christianized feast initially influenced by Celtic harvest festivals,[8][9] with possible pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic Samhain.[6][10][11] Other academics maintain that it originated independently of Samhain and has solely Christian roots.[12]...


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:39 am 
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Christianity


Halloween Scripture Candy with gospel tract
Christian attitudes towards Halloween are diverse. In the Anglican Church, some dioceses have chosen to emphasize the Christian traditions associated with All Hallow's Eve.[136][137] Some of these practises include praying, fasting and attending worship services.[1][2][3]
Father, All-Powerful and Ever-Living God, today we rejoice in the holy men and women of every time and place. May their prayers bring us your forgiveness and love. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen. —All Hallow's Eve Prayer from the Liturgy of the Hours[138]



Votive candles in the Halloween section of Wal-Mart
Other Protestant Christians also celebrate All Hallows' Eve as Reformation Day, a day to remember the Protestant Reformation, alongside All Hallow's Eve or independently from it.[139][140] This is because Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to All Saints' Church in Wittenberg on All Hallows' Eve, because hundreds of visitors would come to the church during the celebration of Hallowmas.[141] Often, "Harvest Festivals" or "Reformation Festivals" are held on All Hallows' Eve, in which children dress up as Bible characters or Reformers.[142] In addition to distributing candy to children who are trick-or-treating on Hallowe'en, many Christians also provide gospel tracts to them. One organization, the American Tract Society, stated that around 3 million gospel tracts are ordered from them alone for Hallowe'en celebrations.[143] Others order Halloween-themed Scripture Candy to pass out to children on this day.[144]


Belizean children dressed up as Biblical figures and Christian saints
Some Christians feel concerned about the modern celebration of Halloween because they feel it trivializes – or celebrates – paganism, the occult, or other practices and cultural phenomena deemed incompatible with their beliefs.[145] Father Gabriele Amorth, an exorcist in Rome, has said, "if English and American children like to dress up as witches and devils on one night of the year that is not a problem. If it is just a game, there is no harm in that."[146] In more recent years, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston has organized a "Saint Fest" on Halloween.[147] Similarly, many contemporary Protestant churches view Halloween as a fun event for children, holding events in their churches where children and their parents can dress up, play games, and get candy for free. Many Christians ascribe no negative significance to Halloween, treating it as a fun event devoted to "imaginary spooks" and handing out candy. To these Christians, Halloween holds no threat to the spiritual lives of children: being taught about death and mortality, and the ways of the Celtic ancestors actually being a valuable life lesson and a part of many of their parishioners' heritage.[148]
In the Roman Catholic Church, Halloween's Christian connection is cited, and Halloween celebrations are common in Catholic parochial schools throughout North America and in Ireland.[149] Many fundamentalist and evangelical churches use "Hell houses", themed pamphlets, or comic-style tracts such as those created by Jack T. Chick in order to make use of Halloween's popularity as an opportunity for evangelism.[147] Some consider Halloween to be completely incompatible with the Christian faith due to its putative origins in the Festival of the Dead celebration.[150] Indeed, even though Eastern Orthodox Christians observe All Hallows' Day on the First Sunday after Pentecost, the Eastern Orthodox Church recommends the observance of Vespers and/or a Paraklesis on the Western observance of All Hallows' Eve, out of the pastoral need to provide an alternative to popular celebrations.[151]
Other religions
The reaction of non-Christian religions towards Halloween has often been mixed, ranging from stern disapproval to the allowance of participation in it. According to Alfred J. Kolatch in the Second Jewish Book of Why, in Judaism, Halloween is not permitted by Jewish Halakha because it violates Leviticus 18:3 which forbids Jews from partaking in gentile customs. Many Jews observe Yizkor, which is equivalent to the observance of Hallowmas in Christianity, as prayers are said for both "martyrs and for one's own family."[152] Nevertheless many American Jews celebrate Halloween, disconnected from its Christian origins.[153] Reform Rabbi Jeffrey Goldwasser has said that “There is no religious reason why contemporary Jews should not celebrate Halloween" while Orthodox Rabbi Michael Broyde has argued against Jews observing the holiday.[154] Sheikh Idris Palmer, author of A Brief Illustrated Guide to Understanding Islam , has argued that Muslims should not participate in Halloween, stating that "participation in it is similar to one commemorating Christmas or Easter, or congratulating the Christians upon their prostration to the crucifix".[155] Javed Memon, a Muslim writer, has disagreed, saying that his "daughter dressing up like a British telephone booth will not destroy her faith".[156] Most Hindus do not observe All Hallows' Eve, instead remembering the dead in the festival of Pitru Paksha, during which Hindus pay hommage to and perform a ceremony "to keep the souls of their ancestors at rest."[157] The celebration of the Hindu festival Diwali sometimes conflicts with the date of Halloween; but some Hindus choose to participate in the popular customs of Halloween.[158] Other Hindus, such as Soumya Dasgupta, have opposed the celebration on the grounds that Western holidays like Halloween have "begun to adversely affect our indigenous festivals."[159] Neopagans do not observe Halloween, but instead observe Samhain on November 1,[160] although some neopagan individuals choose to participate in cultural Halloween festivities, opining the idea that one can observe both "the solemnity of Samhain in addition to the fun of Halloween." Other neopagans are opposed to the celebration of Halloween, believing that it "trivializes Samhain",[161] and "avoid Halloween, because of the interruptions from trick or treaters."[162]


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:44 am 
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I always find certain things funny, like how some groups say that Halloween has nothing to do with Christianity and then you have groups like Jews and Muslims saying that their people shouldn't do it because it has roots in Christianity.
LOL !


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:48 am 
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PSacramento wrote:
I always find certain things funny, like how some groups say that Halloween has nothing to do with Christianity and then you have groups like Jews and Muslims saying that their people shouldn't do it because it has roots in Christianity.
LOL !



::))



Peace,
tammy


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:00 am 
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In the U.S., Halloween doesn't really have religious significance, at least not anymore. It's more of a fun day for kids and adults alike who enjoy dressing up in the wackiest way they can.

If it's supposed to be a day of remembering the dead and the saints and such, then what's the or all the spiritistic connections with the holiday? I have a hard time believing that God looks upon this holiday with any sort of approval. Maybe that's just my JW upbringing speaking, but I dunno...


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:45 am 
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Since we are not to judge one another, dear P (peace to you, luv!), I think we have to admit that, as with all things, it is up to the person to choose (what they will do). Having accurate information regarding Hallowe'en might help make that choice. Unfortunately, I don't have time to share that, just now, but I will when I return. Keep in mind, please, that it will be truth... which all are not always able to handle, but for those who desire truth it will make total sense. It WON'T be anything WTBTS-ish ('cause they don't know, either), so no one needs to worry, there.

Peace... and "see" you all a bit later!

YSSFS of Christ,

Shellamar


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:09 pm 
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leaving_quietly wrote:
In the U.S., Halloween doesn't really have religious significance, at least not anymore. It's more of a fun day for kids and adults alike who enjoy dressing up in the wackiest way they can.

If it's supposed to be a day of remembering the dead and the saints and such, then what's the or all the spiritistic connections with the holiday? I have a hard time believing that God looks upon this holiday with any sort of approval. Maybe that's just my JW upbringing speaking, but I dunno...


God looking upon Halloween with some sort of disapproval...
Interesting...

I think that there are a few ways to address that:
Are there any OT Laws being broken in Halloween? if so then YES in THAT regard God would have issues with Halloween.
Are there any commandments either from the OT or NT that are being broken?

Truth is that I am sure there are some being broken by some people.
I have no doubt of that, but I don't think that has anything to do with Halloween per say.
Though having an occasion to be bad does certainly motivate some to do just that.

There is no worship or glorification of witches and satan when people dress up for silly fun.
To be silly is just that.

I think when people throw around the term "idol worship" and "false gods" as much as they do we tend to lose the very REAL and important understanding of what that is:
Denial and rejection of God and Christ.

DO you do that at Halloween?


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:14 pm 
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November 1st is All Saints' Day, which, by the way, includes very many people not officially known as saints. The following day, incidentally, is All Souls' Day which includes everyone who has died.

On each day, it is a day when those who have died are especially prayed for, a very ancient tradition indeed, and I know it doesn't accord with some of the more extreme forms of Protestant belief, but I include that information to help with the understanding of Hallowe'en.

The old word for All Saints' Day was All Hallows' Day. Thus, the day before was considered the "Eve" of that day, just as Christmas Eve is the night before Christmas. So, Hallowe'en was the Eve of All Hallows' Day. LQ, it wasn't a day for remembering the dead. It was the day before that day.

It was first commercialised in the US, but in mediaeval times it was observed in Britain and across Europe. Various old-fashioned games used to take place, such as apple-bobbing, where a player had to try to fish an apple out of the bowl of water it was floating in, without using their hands, i.e. with teeth only, or out of a dish of flour, and snapdragon, where raisins or other sweetmeats floating in a dish of brandy which was then set alight, were then to be fished out of the flaming dish, at the risk of burnt fingers. All were occasions of much mirth. Apples suspended on strings were another game, also to be captured with teeth and no hands.

The pumpkins, or turnips, carved into a face with holes for eyes and mouth and containing a lit candle, were placed on a windowsill in order to frighten away the evil spirits believed to be lurking in the night air in that special evening.

That's the origin of the American custom of trick or treating, unknown in England until perhaps twenty years ago. It wasn't here in this country when my older children, now in their forties, were young. Even their younger siblings never took part, but within the last twenty years or so it does seem to have taken off here. It still isn't very widespread, at least where I live, and schools discourage it. I believe it may be more popular in other parts of the country.

When I was growing up there were occasional Hallowe'en parties where we played those simple old-fashioned games and trick or treating was completely unknown. No-one had ever heard of it.

Bearing in mind the conclusion of Shelby's post above, it's worth saying that what I have written here is truthful as an account of the ancient tradition of Hallowe'en and it's history and observance in Britain and at least some parts of Europe. In that sense it is the truth.

However, Shelby tells us that she is going to tell us the truth that some, she says, might not want to hear. So we'll look forward to that.


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 5:26 pm 
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What you shared is accurate, dear Char (peace to you!)... but not complete. I discussed the matter with our Lord on my way home this afternoon: should I share or shouldn't I, given other current discussions? His response was that it was my choice (as all things are)... but reminded me about "throwing" things. Your comments just now have helped me to decide, then, and while I will share it, it won't be on the open board, sorry. I'm just too tired, right now, to take on two silly discussions at the same time. I'm sure you understand.

Peace!

YSSFS of Christ,

Shellamar


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:05 pm 
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A truer version of the occasion is the Mexican practice Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). For those who didn't see my post elsewhere:

Quote:
Assured that the dead would be insulted by mourning or sadness, Dia de los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Dia de los Muertos recognizes death as a natural part of the human experience, a continuum with birth, childhood, and growing up to become a contributing member of the community. On Dia de los Muertos, the dead are also a part of the community, awakened from their eternal sleep to share celebrations with their loved ones.


(from National Geographic)


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:13 pm 
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Probably for more modern-day purposes, dear GL (peace to you!). Dear hubby and I are huge Freda Kahlo fans (we've even been to her house in Tenochtitlan!)... and we often attend Dia de La Muerte festivals in our area (hubby's Hispanic). We don't necessarily celebrate the dead (there are Native observances including dancing, prayer, and harvest sacrifices)... but we like the art, etc.

What I will share (at some point) predates all of this, though - it actually goes back to Noah and the Flood. And has nothing to do with death but with life. Unfortunately, as with most holidays, the original/true purpose for the celebration has been lost... covered over... by a LOT of "christian"... as well as "pagan"... and now, commercial... mmmmmmm... "distractions."

Sort of like how some religions (and one or two in particular) went about the earth covering over other religions' temples and such... only to construct over them other temples and such.

Peace!

Your servant and a slave of Christ,

Shellamar


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 4:45 pm 
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I admit I like Halloween, I like hanakkuh, I love Easter, and I LOVE CHRISTMAS YAY! But I also would celebrate the opening of an envelope because I like to decorate the house and eat sweets and of course have presents.

BS goes treat or treating but she likes to give the home owners sweets lol! I have pumpkins and I have a broomstick to put on the door and BS wants to buy CSI tape so our house is a crime scene. Hubby has a werewolve mask and he is hiding down the side of the door so when kids come a calling he will jump out and terrify them. To me it's just daft and the kids love it, plus I get to eat BS sweets when she's gone to bed *evil cackle*


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 Post subject: Re: Halloween
PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:41 pm 
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I don't celebrate anything. OK I am still in so I would have to take precautions not to be caught. But all those same festivals repeated year after year. Aren't you bored with such a routine? Every day should be different. And not to neglect that they are exploited by the capitalists. Actually they are promoting consumerism.


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